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marie paulze lavoisier quotes

A team of experts from across The Met gains new understanding of Jacques Louis Davids iconic portrait. According to Fara: If you look back through history, there are thousands of invisible assistants who are actually making experiments work and women are one particular category of invisible assistants. Yet though Marie-Anne does feature prominently in some accounts of his work she remains entirely absent from others. There is a wonderful portrait of Marie and Antoine by Jacques David in the Met in New York, in which Marie takes center stage, as she often did (second image). This was an invaluable service to Lavoisier, who relied on Paulze's translation of foreign works to keep abreast of current developments in chemistry. Related Papers. This colleague was Antoine Lavoisier, a French nobleman and scientist. During the French Revolution, Du Pont fled to America, where he expressed the opinion that the Louisiana Territory, recently gained from Spain, ought to be sold to the United States. Among the most spectacular findings was that, beneath the austere background, Madame Lavoisier had first been depicted wearing an enormous hat decorated with ribbons and artificial flowers. It is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Women in Chemistry and Physics, A Biobibliographic Sourcebook. Her family was part of the Some of her drawings of Lavoisiers experiments also survive, in which she often portrayed herself at the sketch table (first and fourth images).Dr. His father served as an attorney at the Parlement of Paris, and provided his son the best education . Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier 1743-1794 Marie Anne Paulze Lavoisier 1758-1836. She refutes without hesitating the doctrine of the great scholars of the time. She had survived the French Revolution, the Terror, the rise of Bonaparte, the fall of Bonaparte, and the 1830 Revolution, coming out on top of every change of fortune by virtue of her tenacity and innate sense of self-worth, and the affection of her large circle of friends who had been drawn to her by her intellect, generosity, and refreshingly brusque candor. In acquiring the IRR images, we sought the assistance of Evan Read, Manager of Technical Documentation, who used a specialized camera to record the entire painting. Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze (20 January 1758 in Montbrison, Loire, France - 10 February 1836) was a French chemist and noble. Lacking for nothing and universally adored at her height, she is now, at the moment of her release from jail after sixty-five days of anxiously waiting to be dragged before the dread revolutionary Tribunal, unsure from whence the basic necessities of life are to come. Born January 20, 1758, Marie-Anne Paulze Lavoisier was lab assistant to her husband, Antoine Lavoisier, whom she married at the age of 13. Comments or corrections are welcome; please direct to [email protected]. As far as I know, however, it isnt available in English translation, so if you dont know French then Id point you to a chapter on Madame Lavoisier in the recently published Women in their Element (2019). She was bankrupt following the new government's confiscation of her money and property (which were eventually returned). Women You Should Know All rights reserved. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794) and Marie Anne Lavoisier (Marie Anne Pierrette Paulze, 1758-1836) was purchased for the Met in 1977 by philanthropists Charles and Jayne Wrightsman. In later drawings, of experiments on the chemistry of human respiration, Marie-Anne depicted herself seated at a table in the laboratory, taking notes. A century before Marie Curie made a place for women in theoretical science, editor, translator, and illustrator Marie Paulze Lavoisier (1758-1836), wife and research partner of chemist Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, surrounded herself with laboratory work. In the synthesis experiment, a jet of hydrogen was set alight as it flowed into a flask of oxygen. Marie-Anne fue esposa de Antoine Lavoisie, a quien asista en el laboratorio durante el da, anotando observaciones en el libro de notas y dibujando diagramas Oil on canvas, 83 59 in. Throughout his imprisonment, Paulze visited Lavoisier regularly and fought for his release. Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, Marie Gabrielle Capet (17611818) and Marie Marguerite Carreaux de Rosemond (died 1788), 1785. Fr Lavoisier var eiginkona efnafringsins og aalsmannsins Antoine Lavoisier og starfai sem flagi hans rannsknarstofu og lagi sitt af mrkum til vinnu hans. File:Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794) and His Wife (Marie Anne Pierrette Paulze, 1758-1836) MET DP-13140-002.jpg Metadata This file contains additional information such as Exif metadata which may have been added by the digital camera, scanner, or software program used to create or digitize it. [7], Paulze began receiving artistic instruction from the painter Jacques-Louis David in later 1785 or early 1786. Can you pronounce this word better. Madame Lavoisier was the wife of the chemist and nobleman Antoine Lavoisier, and acted as his laboratory companion and contributed to his work. She was by now armed with a formidable education and was quite capable of both translating and critiquing the essay. She was 13 and was already known as an intelligent and engaging social hostess. Research scientist Silvia A. Centeno acquiring X-ray fluorescence maps of Davids portrait of the Lavoisiers. A century before Marie Curie made a place for women in theoretical science, editor, translator, and illustrator Marie Paulze Lavoisier (1758-1836), wife and research partner of chemist Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, surrounded herself with laboratory work. Marie-Anne Pierette Paulze, better known as Madame Lavoisier, was born Jan. 20, 1758. Reinstallation of Davids portrait in The Mets European Paintings galleries in 2020, following conservation treatment and technical analysis. Right: Detail of hat revealed through the combined elemental distribution map of lead (shown in white) and mercury (shown in red) obtained by macro x-ray fluorescence (MA-XRF) in Jacques-Louis Davids Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (17431794) and Marie Anne Lavoisier (Marie Anne Pierrette Paulze, 17581836) (1788). Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze (20 January 1758 in Montbrison, Loire, France - 10 February 1836) was a French chemist and noblewoman. She played a pivotal role in the translation of several scientific works . Marie kept lab notes for her husband. To indirectly thwart the marriage, Jacques Paulze made an offer to one of his colleagues to ask for his daughter's hand instead. Her father, Jacques Paulze, worked primarily as a parliamentary lawyer and financier. Each Saturday was devoted to science. Pronunciation of Marie-Anne Paulze Lavoisier with 1 audio pronunciations. Calculating and plotting the information contained in these spectra results in elemental distribution maps. Napoleon, for his part, listened to Du Ponts ideas and reasons, agreed, and the United States doubled its size. Top Marie Paulze Lavoisier Quotes. For example, the desk was of such a specific neoclassical form that it seemed likely to be the sitters own. Difficult. One challenge was determining a solvent mixture that was not only safe for the painting but also nontoxic for the conservator. Information about your use of this website will be shared with Google and other third parties. Change, Creating, Transformation. Lavoisierbuilt his reputation on identifying oxygen, but his wife was the English-speaking expert available to negotiate with Joseph Priestley, who had already discovered the same gas but given it a different name. Some decades later, Marie-Anne described this as his day of happiness. Center: Infrared reflectogram (IRR) of Davids portrait of the Lavoisiers. She played a pivotal role in the translation of several scientific works, and was instrumental to the . It does have what feels like a tendency to go into longer accounts of people and events only partially connected to Marie-Anne by way of padding out the story, but what is there, from extensively quoted letters to crucial data about the intellectual and political events that shaped Marie-Annes time, is your best chance of learning about this remarkable 18th century figure. In March 1785, the Lavoisiers were finishing a series of experiments on the decomposition and recomposition of water experiments that Antoine viewed as some of the most crucial in bringing down the phlogiston theory. Marie-Anne asked Antoine-Laurent to teach her what he knew of chemistry and physics and he responded with the first instinct of all great teachers: How can I teach a subject I know so little of? [4][3] Despite her contributions, she was not attributed as a translator in the original work but in later editions. Absent from general knowledge are the research contributions of Marie Anne Paulze (Lavoisier's wife and collaborator). Madame Lavoisier was the wife of the chemist and nobleman Antoine Lavoisier, and acted as his laboratory companion and contributed to his work. Photo credit: Department of Scientific Research and Department of Paintings Conservation, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. From La Magasin des Modes Nouvelles, no. Download. Madame Lavoisier was the wife of the chemist and nobleman Antoine Lavoisier, and acted as his laboratory companion and contributed to his work. En este vdeo hablamos sobre Marie-Anne Paulze Lavoisier, la madre de la qumica moderna.Ms informacin sobre ella: https://minervasvoice.com/quienes-son-el. It was in the course of this intimate, daily relationship of poring over the surface that certain irregularities became apparent: points of red paint protruding from beneath the surface above Madame Lavoisiers head; red paint showing through the cracks of the blue ribbons and bows of her dress; and, finally, a series of minute drying cracks suggesting that something was concealed beneath the red tablecloth in the foreground. Hayley Bennett investigates. A friend of the Lavoisiers, Jean Baptiste Pluvinet, was related to the wife of the deputy reporter preparing the cases against the General Farm, a monsieur Dupin. Patricia Fara, Worked to fund and promote the discoveries of her husband, Antoine Lavoisier, built his reputation on identifying oxygen. Nevertheless, her efforts secured her husband's legacy in the field of chemistry. Marie Anne Lavoisier translated Richard Kirwan's 'Essay on Phlogiston' from English to French which allowed her husband and . Though not directly venturing again into the scientific arena, she provided a crucial location where French scientists and mathematicians could meet international figures who were passing through Paris, and informally discuss new, emerging ideas. What decisions had been made, and when? [A] few young people proud to be granted the honour of cooperating on his experiments, gathered in the morning, in the laboratory, she wrote. Antoine-Laurent demonstrated that the . Madame Lavoisier was the wife of the chemist and nobleman Antoine Lavoisier, and acted as his laboratory companion and contributed to his work. Lavoisier was about 28, while Marie-Anne was about 13. [1] How did the two relate? lustraci, ning ms va fer tantes aportacions al naixement de la qumica moderna com el matrimoni format pels francesos Antoine Lavoisier i Marie-Anne Pau. She was ordering in stock, writing out the results of the experiments and thats a very important part.. Since entering the collection in 1977, when Charles and Jayne Wrightsman purchased this painting for the Museum, it has remained on constant display in the galleries. By the time Marie-Anne was 17, the couple were hosting Monday night dinners for scientific notables at their home at the Paris Arsenal, where Antoine had taken up a post as commissioner for the Royal Gunpowder and Saltpetre Administration. A couple of quotes exemplify the relationship. (210.8 151.1 cm). Very easy. Among those released is a woman, once the sparkling center of Parisian scientific life, now widowed at the hand of Citizen Guillotine and utterly destitute. All rights reserved. Despite his progressive outlook, Antoine along with other royal tax collectors including Marie-Annes own father was arrested and eventually guillotined for defrauding the state. Lavoisier accepted the proposition, and he and Marie-Anne were married on 16 December 1771. A combination of non-invasive infrared reflectography (IRR) and macro X-ray fluorescence mapping (MA-XRF) were employed to image and analyze the work. Originally published by S.A. Centeno, D. Mahon, F. Car and D. Pullins, Heritage Science (Springer Open), 2021. Pronunciation of Marie Anne Paulze Lavoisier with 2 audio pronunciations, 1 meaning and more for Marie Anne Paulze Lavoisier. The Parisian fashion press was so active, and trends so rapid, that the invention of a particular hat or dress can often be dated to within a few months. Marie died very suddenly in her home in Paris on 10 February 1836, at the age of 78. Lavoisier repeatedly served on committees representing the interests of the Third Estate and argued strenuously for changes in the economic system of France, but as a member of the General Farm he was also associated with the hated Old Regimes tax collection system, and when the Committee of Public Safety decided the entire Farm must be indicted as treasonous and counter-revolutionary, Lavoisier was lumped in with his far less scrupulous colleagues. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Julia A. Berwind, 1953 (53.225.5) Right: lisabeth Louise Vige Le Brun (French, 17491803). In 1771, Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, a renowned French chemist, married Marie Anne Pierrette Paulze, the 14-year-old daughter of a member of the Tax Farm that he was employed in. Borgias, Adriane P. "Marie Anne Pierrette Paulze Lavoisier." Crawford, Franklin. In addition, the new government seized all of Lavoisier's notebooks and laboratory equipment. 36 (10 November 1787). [5] She also translated works by Joseph Priestley, Henry Cavendish, and others for Lavoisier's personal use. There is much to say about Rumford and Marie-Annes relationship, but before she allowed herself to give way to his entreaties, she embarked on what was to be her final public service to the chemical world, when she undertook to publish the collected works of Lavoisier that he had been working on during his imprisonment. Here they would remain for most of their remaining years together, experimenting and entertaining guests. At nearly nine feet high by six feet wide, any treatment of this portrait represents a significant commitment. This husband-and-wife team helped usher in a new era for the science of chemistry. Lavoisier accepted the proposition, and he and Marie-Anne were married on 16 December 1771. At the time, Antoine and Marie-Annes father were both tax farmers with the Ferme gnrale, a tax collection operation that made money by collecting tax for the king. If you look back through history, there are thousands of invisible assistants who are actually making experiments work. The first volume contained work on heat and the formation of liquids, while the second dealt with the ideas of combustion, air, calcination of metals, the action of acids, and the composition of water. In fact, she wrote a preface to the French version with the explicit intention of undermining Kirwans stance before the reader even got to it by alleging that the phlogiston theory was always supposing, and sometimes contradicting itself rather than being based, like Lavoisiers new chemistry, only on established facts. Together, the Lavoisiers rebuilt the field of chemistry, which had its roots in alchemy and at the time was a convoluted science dominated by George Stahls theory of phlogiston. Though its uncertain if she was ever involved in further science experiments, she arranged the publication of Antoines memoirs in 1805 and wrote the preface herself. Lavoisier was soon appointed to a government post at the Arsenal and began his rise through the chemical ranks. She also assisted him by translating documents about chemistry from English to French. At the end of her time at the convent, she was a confident, talented girl, sure of herself and her abilities. Marie-Anne Paulze Lavoisier is most famous for being the wife of Antoine Lavoisier, a chemist who discovered the law of conservation of mass. The arrival of a new girl, a daughter of a rich member of the General Farm, was so much blood in the water to the Parisian social climber set, and soon after settling down, her fathers patron put pressure on him to marry her off to an elderly acquaintance of low means and unknown character. Her finances re-established, she took her place again as the leading light of Pariss scientific salon scene, hosting such mathematical and scientific luminaries as Laplace, Lagrange, Poisson, Monge, Humboldt, and the man who was to become, to both of their detriments, her second husband: the Count de Rumford. Lavoisier was soon appointed to a government post at the Arsenal and began his rise through the chemical ranks. [6] The year she died, a book was published, showing that Marie-Anne had a rich theological library with books which included versions of The Bible, St. Augustine's Confessions, Jacques Saurin's Discours sur la Bible, Pierre Nicole's Essais de Morale, Blaise Pascal's Lettres provinciales, Louis Bourdaloue's Sermons, Thomas Kempis's De Imitatione Christi, etc. Comtesse de la Chtre (Marie Charlotte Louise Perrette Agla Bontemps, 17621848), Reimagining the European Painting Galleries, from Giotto to Goya. Irresponsible teachers who havent really investigated their topic tend to believe they know it completely, and are willing and eager to show off their knowledge at any time, but the great ones know that, beneath the apparent certainty of the textbook, there is a teeming mass of assumptions and uncertainty, and so they teach only fearfully, out of reverence for the messiness of actual truth, and Antoine-Laurent was one such. Her identity as a woman in the more biological sense, however, he was seemingly less interested in. Duhamel Jean-Florent Defraine. He married Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze. Jim Gaffigan. Yet more evidence of her zeal for the subject comes from reports of her social engagements. Franklin, one of Americas founding fathers and a scientist himself, was involved in the gunpowder trade and received shipments from the French via Lavoisier. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City. Marie Paulze LavoisierA century before Marie Curie made a place for women in theoretical science, editor, translator, and illustrator Marie Paulze Lavoisier (1758-1836), wife and research partner of chemist Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, surrounded herself with laboratory work. After arriving in Conservation in March 2019, Dorothy spent nearly ten months carefully removing the varnish. Just as a good doctor will comprehend an X-radiograph and notice things a less experienced eye might miss, so, too, was a significant degree of knowledge required for a proper interpretation by The Mets team. Before her death, Paulze was able to recover nearly all of Lavoisier's notebooks and chemical apparatuses, most of which survive in a collection at Cornell University, the largest of its kind outside of Europe. anwiki Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze; Paulze was also instrumental in the 1789 publication of Lavoisier's Elementary Treatise on Chemistry, which presented a unified view of chemistry as a field. [1] She is buried in the cemetery of Pere-Lachaise in Paris. Born in 1758, Marie-Anne Pierette Paulze married Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier, the chemist famous for the law of conservation of mass, at the age of thirteen. She was born in 1758 to a father whose connections gave him a position in the General Farm, monarchical Frances privatized tax collection system, and a mother who passed away when she was only three years old. Lavoisier continued to work for the Ferme-Gnrale but in 1775 was appointed gunpowder administrator, leading the couple to settle down at the Arsenal in Paris. In 1793 Lavoisier, due to his prominent position in the Ferme-Gnrale, was branded a traitor during the Reign of Terror by French revolutionaries. [3] Furthermore, she served as the editor of his reports. In the case of phlogiston, it was Paulze's translation that convinced him the idea was incorrect, ultimately leading to his studies of combustion and his discovery of oxygen gas. [3] Paulze also insisted throughout her life that she retain her first husband's last name, demonstrating her undying devotion to him. Enjoy reading and share 11 famous quotes about Marie Paulze Lavoisier with everyone. Marie Anne married Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, known as the 'Father of Modern Chemistry,' and was his chief collaborator and laboratory assistant. They were by now a publishing partnership. Marie-Anne persisted, however, and sooner than any might have guessed, she was acting the triple role of scientific secretary, publicist, and translator in one of the late 18th centurys greatest scientific battles. 20002023 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In the service of that conflict Marie-Anne not only kept up a steady correspondence, beseeching those on the fence to come down on the side of the anti-phlogiston theory, but began translating and commenting on British pro-phlogiston tracks, culminating in her 1788 annotated translation of Richard Kirwans 1787 Essay on Phlogiston and the Constitution of Acids. By 1787, when Kirwans phlogiston essay was published, Marie-Anne was nearly 30. Marie Paulze was only 13 when she married the wealthy French lawyerAntoine Lavoisier, and she immediately started learning English so that she could act as the scientific go-between forhis true passionin life chemistry. Antoine Lavoisier. Everything seemed to be going so well for Marie-Anne on the eve of the French Revolution. [1], After his death, Paulze became bitter about what had happened to her husband. She presented his case before Antoine Dupin, who was Lavoisier's accuser and a former member of the Ferme-Gnrale. Antoine Lavoisier. Mme Lavoisier de Rumford stated the count "would make me . Marie did her best to defend her husband, pointing out--quite correctly--that Lavoisier was the greatest chemist that France had ever produced, but her efforts were of little use, and Lavoisier was guillotined on May 8, 1794, on the same day that her father was also executed. Download Free PDF. In the attic at the arsenal, Antoine had set up a large and expensive laboratory where he and Marie-Anne received scientists from all over the world to witness their experiments. Believing him to be so clearly innocent that any jury would and must acquit him, she apparently didnt realize until it was too late the true nature of justice under Robespierre, and it cost Antoine-Laurent his life, and she her freedom for 65 days until the fall of Robespierre allowed her to walk free again. 5 August 2021 . Most chemists believe that anything combustible contained the a fiery substance called phlogiston, which was released during burning, leaving just calx, a kind of ash. She also kept strict records of the procedures followed, lending validity to the findings Lavoisier published. Her art portfolio is also on display and, despite the preened appearance, she has the air of an accomplished woman on equal terms with her husband. Continue Reading. In conversation with The Costume Institutes Jessica Regan, David reviewed a range of periodicals from the period and found that the distinctive red-and-black hat would have been known as a chapeau la Tarare, named after operas by Pierre Beaumarchais, that emerged in the late summer and fall of 1787. [1] She played a pivotal role in the translation of several scientific works, and was instrumental to the standardization of the scientific method. But another identity has been quite literally concealed in the present portrait, and its revelation offers an alternate lens for apprehending Lavoisier not for his contributions to science but simply a wealthy tax collector who could afford the whims of fashionable dress and portraiture that sent him to the guillotine in 1794. He allowed himself to ignore the fact that she lived to make her home the social center of a free-wheeling set of intellectual lights. While we have little documentation about the commission, this starting date made perfect sense since the Lavoisiers paid the artist for completed work in December 1788. With the help of our expert team of art handlers, the painting returned to its frame and found its place on the wall, an anchor of The Mets exceptionally rich neoclassical paintings galleries. An invitation dated 24th January 1783 from Mr. Dorothy and Silvia used these images, together with the observation and chemical analysis of a very small number of microscopic paint samples, to further interpret the elemental maps and assess the characteristics and color of the paint hiding below the surface. Left: Detail of plate 2, by A.-B. To his credit, her father resisted the demand, but realized that it would be only the first of many to come, not all of which he would be able to fend off. Interested in his research, Madame Lavoisier began to study chemistry . Despite these obstacles, Marie-Anne organized the publication of Lavoisier's final memoirs, Mmoires de Chimie, a compilation of his papers and those of his colleagues demonstrating the principles of the new chemistry. Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier was convicted and executed by guillotine on May 8, 1794, and on June 14, Marie-Anne herself was arrested and fully expected to share the same fate. Your email address will not be published. As assistant and colleague of her husband, she became one of chemistry's first female researchers. Slowly, most of what was once hers was returned to her, including her fathers priceless library and her husbands treasured laboratory equipment. Left: Adlade Labille-Guiard (French, 17491803). 102 1/4 x 76 5/8 in. She played a pivotal role in the translation of several scientific works, and was instrumental to the . I grew up in a Catholic family in the Midwest. This conflict revolved essentially around two competing theories about how to explain fire. Born in 1758, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze was educated in a convent but only until age 12. When not translating or keeping up her large scientific correspondence, she sat in on Antoine-Laurents experiments, recorded the relevant data, and used her skills (honed in study with Frances pre-eminent painter of the era, Jacques-Louis David) as an artist to capture the layout of his experimental apparatus for future ages. Moderate. To indirectly thwart the marriage, Jacques Paulze made an offer to one of his colleagues to ask for his daughter's hand instead. Under this model, a substance stops burning either when it has used up all of its phlogiston, or when the air gets saturated in it and can hold no more. . Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze Lavoisier (20 January 1758 in Montbrison, Loire, France - 10 February 1836) was a French chemist and noblewoman. Marie Anne Pierrette Paulze was a significant contributor to the understanding of chemistry in the late 1700s. 30 Jan. 2007. But it was obvious that she too took delight in those days. 7. Without her help, he (or they) would not have been able to critique and refute its contents, and eventually through much toing and froing in the literature overturn the flawed phlogiston theory. In this task, the expertise of research scientist Federico Car in chemical analyses using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was crucial. Lavoisier was soon appointed to a government post at the Arsenal and began his rise through Marie-Anne Pierette Paulze, better known as Madame Lavoisier, was born Jan. 20, 1758. [2] Jacques Paulze tried to object to the union, but received threats about losing his job with the Ferme Gnrale. As a woman in the 18th century, history for a long time assigned the obvious roles to her wife, hostess, subservient helper. Art historian Mary Vidal suggested that it represented the Lavoisiers as models of constructive social behaviour, with Marie-Annes place clearly in the work area with her husband. Mme Lavoisier (1758-1836), daughter of farmer-general Jacques Paulze, married Lavoisier in 1771, when he was her father's assistant at the ferme.She completed her education in Latin and foreign languages under her husband's direction and collaborated with him in his laboratory, translating for him chemistry texts in English and Italian, taking notes on his experiments, and drawing . Antoine Lavoisier, in full Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier, (born August 26, 1743, Paris, Francedied May 8, 1794, Paris), prominent French chemist and leading figure in the 18th-century chemical revolution who developed an experimentally based theory of the chemical reactivity of oxygen and coauthored the modern system for naming chemical substances. She is tolerably handsome, remarked a tobacco tycoon from Virginia, but from her Manner it would seem that she thinks her forte is the Understanding rather than the Person.. Wikipedia (28 entries) edit. 12 Apr. Together, they bought a country estate and sank both money and time into introducing agricultural reform among the farmers there, with varying degrees of success.

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marie paulze lavoisier quotes